E is for the Edge - and missing the obvious

In the records of the Halmote on 19 Jan 28 Henry VIII we read that eight of the residents of Deadwenclough were in dispute over a parcel of land in The Edge in Deadwenclough. At the same Halmote six other tenants (including the ubiquitous Ascheworth) were in dispute over the maintenance of an ‘insufficient road’ leading to their turbary on The Edge in Deadwenclough. And so it continued, with land at The Edge being surrendered at various times, or disputes over access, turbary or the right to use stones or other resources from The Edge.

I had no idea where The Edge was. I looked as the other land mentioned in the same sittings of the Halmote but no clues. I looked for other land referred to in other Halmote entries relating to the same individuals but no joy. I looked at other sources of information on C16 and C17 Rossendale but no ideas. I was stuck.

So I put the history away and went for a walk up Edge Lane.

Edge Lane.

Less than 100 yards from my house.

You muppet, Janet.

Walk over and out come the maps. I knew about the Edgeside ares on the west slopes of The Hile, a hill about a mile east of here. Indeed Edgeside there are links between Edgeside and Springhill (see A is for Ashworth). But that isn’t in Deadwenclough, its in Wolfenden Booth. I also knew that on the west side of Saunder Height (the hill above Springhill, of which more later) are two farms: Edge Side and Edge End. But they aren’t in Deadwenclough either, they are in Lower Booths.

Two hints:
  • the 1842 Cassini map has a farm marked as Edge Cotes about 1 km north of Springhill. It is in Deadwenclough and although can’t be accessed from Edge Lane without needing strong boots is a few hundred yards away.
  • the 1924 Cassini map has an area to the east of Edge Lane labelled Edgeside Holme. I’ve never heard it called that before, its usually known as far Heightside.

But yes, it appears that The Edge was indeed close to my patch and so worth including in data trawls.

And street names, particularly old ones, are named for a reason.